Research

Global Soil Survey

A project that investigated soil nutrient levels of good-performing turf all over the world.

No core aeration, no deep verticutting, and surprise! No summer decline

Perspective. It’s funny how that works. When I first read this research report in 2011, I skimmed over some parts, and cherry-picked what I was looking for — that 15 to 20% surface area removal was required every year in order to keep soil organic matter under control.

Soil test showdown

A recent PACE Turf update mentioned this research project by Jackie Guevara and Kevin Frank: Effects of different soil testing interpretation philosophies on creeping bentgrass and annual bluegrass putting greens.

Fun on my front steps

On February 28, I took Wana—a fine-bladed putting green type manilagrass—rhizomes and cut to a two node length. Then I planted these cut rhizomes, each with two tiny plants on them, in the center of sand-filled pots.

This is why you replicate

On February 28, 2020, I cut some Wana manilagrass rhizomes to a two node length and planted those two node rhizomes in four sand-filled pots. After eight days, I applied the first fertilizer treatment.

Three #rturf projects: green speed & clipvol, zoysia response to fertilizer during grow-in, and report automation

You may have seen a few posts about #rturf on my personal site. I’m writing about that topic over there so I don’t clutter up the ATC site with too much data analysis and computer code.

Hollow-tine cultivation and solid-tine spiking both failed to alleviate summer bentgrass decline

A late July solid-tine spiking treatment of a creeping bentgrass green in Hokkaido, Japan How’s this for a lede? “Hollow-tine coring and solid-tine spiking practices may not alleviate creeping bentgrass summer decline.

Have we been doing it all wrong? Soil testing and composite samples

After I wrote the seven part series about soil sampling for turfgrass, I formatted the posts into an easy-to-read 11 page PDF brochure. The take-home message is yes, we’ve been doing it wrong.

Twice the growth at a different mowing height

Bill Kreuser shared a fascinating update from one of the experiments he is conducting this summer. I wouldn’t have expected to see such a big difference in growth rate with a mowing height difference of 0.

Roots on grass supplied with N, P, and K

The N-only pot looked pretty good when I showed roots after 184 days. But that same grass grew a lot more, and produced a lot more underground roots and rhizomes, when P and K were added.