Fertilizer

MLSN

Minimum levels for sustainable nutrition—MLSN—is a modern method for interpreting soil tests for turfgrass.

Simple solutions to a difficult problem

When Bernd Leinauer introduced me prior to this talk, he mentioned that I’m one of the most controversial turfgrass scientists today. And the reason for being controversial happens to be the very topic of this presentation1 that I’ve uploaded today to my YouTube channel.

MLSN and turfgrass nutrient recommendations

GCM Magazine has another article about the SLAN and MLSN methods for soil test interpretation. The article summarizes Jackie Guevara’s research (with Kevin Frank at Michigan State University) into turfgrass response when P and K applications are made based on MLSN.

Lack of response to a fertilizer application

These pots of variegated tropical carpetgrass (Axonopus compressus) received an application of granular 16-16-16 fertilizer twelve days before this photo was taken. The grass on the right responded with a lot more growth than did the grass at left.

Extending the beer analogy

I’ve explained how MLSN works by telling a story about beer. Specifically, about a natural and logical method to figure out how many beers to buy at the store prior to an upcoming party.

Tissue tests as "postmortem types of analyses"

Soil nutrient analyses—soil tests—are used to determine if certain elements are required as fertilizer. If an element is required as fertilizer, the soil test will be interpreted to make a recommendation for the quantity of the element required.

N input accounting

Phil Collinson asked an interesting question: when calculating N inputs, do greenkeepers account for N added outside of fertilizer? Greenkeepers - when calculating N inputs for the year do you account for N outside of fert?

Fun on my front steps

On February 28, I took Wana—a fine-bladed putting green type manilagrass—rhizomes and cut to a two node length. Then I planted these cut rhizomes, each with two tiny plants on them, in the center of sand-filled pots.

This is why you replicate

On February 28, 2020, I cut some Wana manilagrass rhizomes to a two node length and planted those two node rhizomes in four sand-filled pots. After eight days, I applied the first fertilizer treatment.

Three #rturf projects: green speed & clipvol, zoysia response to fertilizer during grow-in, and report automation

You may have seen a few posts about #rturf on my personal site. I’m writing about that topic over there so I don’t clutter up the ATC site with too much data analysis and computer code.